Davenant Digests

Protestant Wisdom in Focus For the Whole Church

Current Issue

Social justice often gets a bad rap. Free marketeers worry about the redistribution of wealth, and social conservatives often see it as being at odds with traditional values. Meanwhile, progressives are tempted to treat social justice as a substitute religion, a means of realizing society's final end without reference to God.

Brian Dijkema thinks both approaches are wrong. In "Who's Afraid of Social Justice?", he argues that justice is first and foremost "giving God his due: our love." But justice does not end there. Love of God entails love of neighbor, and such love inevitably manifests politically. If Christians love their neighbors, they will follow the early Church, imagining "new ways of organizing society." In short, Dijkema contends, working for social justice is Christian work, for it is Gospel work.

We are no longer printing and shipping print copies of Davenant Digests. However, you may download print-files when you subscribe.

PREVIEW

Davenant Digests

Many Protestants today have not merely lost touch with their church’s past, but feel that it has lost touch with them.

With Davenant Digests we seek to bring the church’s past into clear focus for Christians today, and use it to shed light on the challenges of the church's present. Written in a clear, lively, and down-to-earth style, these short introductions aim to answer questions that ordinary Christians have, in terms that ordinary Christians will want to read.

April 2018: Worldview (Brad Littlejohn)

May 2018: Christendom (Joseph Minich)

June 2018: Justification (Chris Castaldo)

July 2018: English Reformation, Pt. I (Brad Littlejohn)

August 2018: Sexual Ethics (Alastair Roberts)

September 2018: Roman Catholicism (Chris Castaldo)

October 2018: Divine Simplicity (Joseph Minich)

November 2018: English Reformation, Pt. II (Brad Littlejohn)

December 2018: How Did We Get Here? (Alastair Roberts)

January 2019: On the Eucharist (Brad Littlejohn)

May 2019: What is Post-Humanism? (Michael Plato)

August 2019: What is Work For? (Joseph Minich)