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  • “Nursing Fathers”: The Magistrate and the Moral Law

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    “Nursing Fathers”: The Magistrate and the Moral Law

    Not many passages in the New Testament speak directly to political order. The first part of the thirteenth chapter of Romans is perhaps the most famous. I would like to focus in this essay on vv. 3-4, which may appear prima facie to be something of an interpretive crux. Are these verses descriptive or prescriptive? That is, are they simply declarative, or are they imperatival, telling us what magistrates ought to do?

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  • Best Reads of 2019

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    Best Reads of 2019

    We asked a handful of our staff and Davenant Fellows what books they particularly enjoyed reading over this past year.

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  • Will All Be Saved? David Bentley Hart on Universal Salvation, Reviewed by John Ehrett

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    Will All Be Saved? David Bentley Hart on Universal Salvation, Reviewed by John Ehrett

    Few topics are more likely to cause a stir among Christians than universal salvation, or apokatastasis—the view that no person will ultimately experience eternal estrangement from God. Although the universalist view is difficult, if not impossible, to reconcile with the authoritative teaching of most Christian churches, it is not consistently considered heresy on the level of, say, denying the Trinity or the hypostatic union in Christ. But the concept of hell as “eternal conscious torment” has undoubtedly been a part of the Christian theological fabric for centuries, and from the perspective of the broader Church catholic, the burden of proof is probably on any challenger wishing to disrupt that consensus.

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  • Enchanted by Story: Literature in Service of Christian Wisdom

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    Enchanted by Story: Literature in Service of Christian Wisdom

    The year of our Lord 2020 is underway, and it has already yielded fruit disproportionate to the days gone by at the Davenant House. On Friday, January 3rd and Saturday, January 4th, we hosted the annual Carolinas Regional Convivium. The topic was Literature in the Service of Christian Wisdom.

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  • A Humble God? Wilcoxen’s Bold Proposal

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    A Humble God? Wilcoxen’s Bold Proposal

    Matthew Wilcoxen’s Divine Humility: God’s Morally Perfect Being stands out among modern accounts of the doctrine of God, drawing out and expanding upon a neglected dimension within the tradition.

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  • The Neglected Craft: Prudence in Reformed Political Thought

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    The Neglected Craft: Prudence in Reformed Political Thought

    Aristotle described politics as involving art or craft (techne). It, too, required skill. It, too, could produce excellent, even wondrous edifices: regimes. Once upon a time, the Reformed tradition saw politics in the same manner. Althusius, for example, spoke of “the art of governing.”[1] Joseph Caryl, a Westminster Divine, described rulers as engaging in an “art” or a “craft.” These thinkers, moreover, developed this artistry, doing so consciously within a Reformed framework.

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  • A Theology of Proportion

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    A Theology of Proportion

    A Review of God in Himself: Scripture, Metaphysics, and the Task of Christian Theology, by Steven J. Duby (InterVarsity Press Academic, 2019) by James Clark When considering how to engage in theology, two inclinations tend to be opposed. The first prioritizes “a speculative doctrine of God driven by natural theology or ‘metaphysics’” which inordinately colors […]

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  • The Classical (Thomistic) Doctrine of God

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    The Classical (Thomistic) Doctrine of God

    Dodds’ work is excellent exposition of the classical doctrine of God, answering the everyday questions of believers. It is unfortunately let down by beginning the development of monotheism with Abraham rather than Adam.

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  • Who Needs Philosophy for Theology? Davenant Hall Course Preview

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    Who Needs Philosophy for Theology? Davenant Hall Course Preview

    Why study philosophy if your interests are in theology?

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