Ad fontes, “to the sources,” was a rallying cry of the Reformation. The Reformers bequeathed to us a heritage, rooted in the Scriptures and their wide-ranging humanistic studies, which sought to address the hard questions of theology, philosophy, and culture in a way that was true to the revelation of God’s word and God’s world. Through this journal, we aim to channel this ethos into a modern context, seeking to explore our questions alongside the great cloud of witnesses and the many exemplars who have gone before us. The goal is to aid ourselves and our neighbors in the wise pursuit of common goods.

Ad Fontes is a quarterly journal (ordinarily, issues will publish in September, December, March, and June). Each issue will feature a couple of longer articles, plus a smattering of shorter articles, historical sketches, and book reviews.

Thanks to a special gift from a generous donor, Ad Fontes will now be available again in print as well as via digital subscription. Subscribe below to receive your quarterly issues! All new subscribers who subscribe within three weeks of an issue's release will receive a print copy of that issue. Subsequent subscribers will begin receiving copies beginning with the next issue.

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Each issue of Ad Fontes is printed in full color and averages 16 pages. Davenant Partners giving $30/mo. or more to the ministry will receive a free print subscription.

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Volume V, Issue 2: Winter 2020


Winter is a time to reflect upon the year behind us and look in patient expectation to the one ahead. Fall has passed, trees are bare, days are short, and we await Spring. It is a natural time for examination of human frailty and finitude.

Fittingly, in this issue of Ad Fontes, E. J. Hutchinson considers the anticipation of spring, comparing the origin myths of pagan poets and Christian accounts of the Garden of Eden, arguing that “spring is the originary state of the world. Fall, on the other hand, comes from the Fall.”

In the second essay, Onsi A. Kamel brings John Williams’ novel Stoner into dialogue with the thought of Kierkegaard, examining what is perhaps the epitome of human faithlessness: adultery.

This issue also features an interview with Samuel L. Bray and Drew N. Keane, editors of a new edition of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer (forthcoming from InterVarsity Press), alongside Joseph Minich’s review of Bavinck: A Critical Biography.


 IN THIS ISSUE:

Ver Erat Aeternum

BY E.J. HUTCHINSON

Fear and Trembling in Stoner

BY ONSI A. KAMEL

Common Prayer: An Interview

BY ONSI A. KAMEL (WITH SAMUEL L. BRAY AND DREW N. KEANE)

A Man for Our Time: A Review of Bavinck – A Critical Biography

BY JOSEPH MINICH

PREVIEW

Articles from Past Issues