Tag: Martin Luther

  • People of the Promise – Buy Your Copy Today!

    People of the Promise – Buy Your Copy Today!

    As we celebrate the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, many Protestants, whether in the pews, the pulpit, or the academy, are apt to feel a bit uncertain about just how enthusiastically they can celebrate the Protestant doctrine of the church. After all, isn’t this doctrine the weakest link in Protestant theology, as modern-day Catholic apologists […]

  • The Gospel Expressed: Luther’s Teaching on Alien Righteousness as Divine Gift

    The Gospel Expressed: Luther’s Teaching on Alien Righteousness as Divine Gift

    When exactly the levee is going to break is not easy to know, but when it does we all know. October 31, 1517 is the day the levee broke in the church of the West. It is not likely that Luther was aware he was laying his ax to the root. But that is what […]

  • The Gospel Embodied: Luther’s Theology of the Lord’s Supper

    The Gospel Embodied: Luther’s Theology of the Lord’s Supper

    Martin Luther sought above all to understand God’s self-revelation in the gospel, and how men and women are to grasp this revelation. In the gospel Luther discovered a God who comes to us. God condescends to us to meet us in our need as Savior and gives himself for us. Jesus Christ is God for […]

  • Calvin’s Luther: Unity and Continuity in Protestantism

    Calvin’s Luther: Unity and Continuity in Protestantism

    [vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]   John Calvin: More Lutheran or Zwinglian? Everybody knows that Calvin was closer to Zurich than to Wittenberg. What this essay presupposes is: Maybe he wasn’t? In fact, Calvin was neither Zwinglian nor Lutheran in the developed sense of those terms, but rather saw himself as one who might mediate between the two sides […]

  • How to Study the Reformation

    How to Study the Reformation

    What sort of person enrolls in a class in Reformation studies? It is a seemingly easy audience to profile. For those few programs which offer such a course, we expect it would be required for any student pursuing a degree in Christian history or theology; for young Reformed individuals who desire a deeper understanding of their tradition but whose career aspirations lie elsewhere, it might be a suitable elective. In short, it is a comfortably esoteric subject with few adepts, and so it has been for centuries. So why are more students suddenly enrolling in these courses?

  • The Neglected Craft: Prudence in Reformed Political Thought

    The Neglected Craft: Prudence in Reformed Political Thought

    Aristotle described politics as involving art or craft (techne). It, too, required skill. It, too, could produce excellent, even wondrous edifices: regimes. Once upon a time, the Reformed tradition saw politics in the same manner. Althusius, for example, spoke of “the art of governing.”[1] Joseph Caryl, a Westminster Divine, described rulers as engaging in an “art” or a “craft.” These thinkers, moreover, developed this artistry, doing so consciously within a Reformed framework.

  • Martin Luther and Tax: A Protestant Perspective on Redistributive Taxation

    Martin Luther and Tax: A Protestant Perspective on Redistributive Taxation

    The redistributive grammar of Luther’s theology of the Lord’s Supper underlies his vision for poor relief and, thus, implicates redistributive taxation.