Inhabiting the Places of Promise: Martin Luther’s Teaching on the Three Institutions


Reflection on the institutions, on the shape of the divine promises to care for human life as revealed in Scripture, brings to light that to which our hearts cling in social and political life.

The Neglected Craft: Prudence in Reformed Political Thought


Aristotle described politics as involving art or craft (techne). It, too, required skill. It, too, could produce excellent, even wondrous edifices: regimes. Once upon a time, the Reformed tradition saw politics in the same manner. Althusius, for example, spoke of “the art of governing.”[1] Joseph Caryl, a Westminster Divine, described rulers as engaging in an “art” or a “craft.” These thinkers, moreover, developed this artistry, doing so consciously within a Reformed framework.