Category: Publications and Translation Projects

  • Introducing Wenden House and the Davenant Fellows

    Introducing Wenden House and the Davenant Fellows

    Last month, New Saint Andrews launched their new Reformation translation program, Wenden House for Reformation Studies.  This program aims to capitalize on the extraordinary Latin curriculum that NSA has had in place for many years, and its rigorous theologically-anchored liberal arts program, in order to equip the next generation of Latin scholars to bring key Reformation […]

  • The Protestant Doctrine of the Church and its Rivals

    The Protestant Doctrine of the Church and its Rivals

    This article is taken from the first issue of Ad Fontes: a Journal of Protestant Resourcement. Subscriptions to the print edition are available for $5/month. This is one of two articles in our inaugural issue and is written by Bradley Belschner. Belschner is a systems analyst at Emsi, a determined generalist, and an enthusiast of […]

  • People of the Promise – Buy Your Copy Today!

    People of the Promise – Buy Your Copy Today!

    As we celebrate the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, many Protestants, whether in the pews, the pulpit, or the academy, are apt to feel a bit uncertain about just how enthusiastically they can celebrate the Protestant doctrine of the church. After all, isn’t this doctrine the weakest link in Protestant theology, as modern-day Catholic apologists […]

  • PUBLISHED: Reformation Theology

    PUBLISHED: Reformation Theology

    On October 31st, The Davenant Institute published Reformation Theology: A Reader of Primary Sources with Introductions. Edited by Bradford Littlejohn and Jonathan Roberts, this work reflects the clarion call of the Protestant Reformers, “Ad fontes!—Back to the sources!” for our own generation. Just as they recognized that renewal of the church in their era depended upon a […]

  • Announcing Acquisition of Peter Martyr Library

    Announcing Acquisition of Peter Martyr Library

      We are pleased to announce that The Davenant Institute has just concluded a contract with Truman State University Press to take full possession of the Peter Martyr Library. Effective Jan. 1, 2018, TSUP will transfer all rights, electronic files, and hard copies of the ten volumes of the Peter Martyr Library (including its accompanying […]

  • Now Published: Natural Law

    Now Published: Natural Law

    We are pleased to announce the publication of the third installment in our Davenant Guides series, Natural Law: A Brief Introduction and Biblical Defense. Davenant Guides seek to offer short and accessible introductions to key issues of current debate in theology and ethics, drawing on a magisterial Protestant perspective and defending its contemporary relevance today.   In […]

  • Davenant’s First Two Publications Get a Makeover

    Davenant’s First Two Publications Get a Makeover

    We are pleased to announce that we have updated and revised two of our earlier publications, For the Healing of the Nations and For Law and for Liberty. You will find descriptions of each work below.

  • Protestantism’s Idolatry Problem

    Protestantism’s Idolatry Problem

    Protestantism today has an idolatry problem. And by that I do not mean what countless Protestant preachers on both the left and the right can be heard thundering from pulpits every Sunday—that we have embraced the idol of Mammon, or of the State, or of personal freedom, or of gluten-free dieting, etc. This may all be true enough, and yet when we seek to make the pervasive biblical warnings against idolatry relevant to the modern world in this way, we manage to miss a central strand of the Bible’s teaching on the subject: that we can make an idol of Yahweh, the Holy One of Israel.

  • Why Another Atheism Book?

    Why Another Atheism Book?

    There is not a shortage of books arguing against atheism propositionally. But what about trying to understand it on an emotional and existential level?

  • Why You Should Care About Peter Martyr Vermigli

    Why You Should Care About Peter Martyr Vermigli

    We tend to operate with an implicit Darwinian cynicism when it comes to the history of ideas—if someone or something has been consigned to the dustbin of history, there’s probably, we suspect, a good reason for it. At the very least, we figure, theology seems to be doing just fine without the contributions of this neglected genius, so he can’t be all that important. There are of course any number of holes in this train of reasoning, which probably become obvious enough simply by making these implicit musings explicit. But let’s focus on the last one. Is it really the case that our theology today is “doing just fine”?