Tag: Davenant House

  • A New Property. A New Residential Fellowship.

    A New Property. A New Residential Fellowship.

    A new property and a new Residential Fellowship at Davenant House.

  • Education and the Kingdom of God: Convivium Irenicum 2021 Write-Up

    Education and the Kingdom of God: Convivium Irenicum 2021 Write-Up

    A write-up of the 2021 National Convivium Irenicum on “Education and the Kingdom of God”

  • Davenant’s Big Move – A Letter from the President

    Davenant’s Big Move – A Letter from the President

    A long-term base for Davenant’s work from Summer 2021

  • Pursuing Wisdom in a Time of Crisis

    Pursuing Wisdom in a Time of Crisis

    As we approach the seventh anniversary of our founding, we are now poised to open an exciting new chapter in the ministry of the Davenant Institute.

  • Enchanted by Story: Literature in Service of Christian Wisdom

    Enchanted by Story: Literature in Service of Christian Wisdom

    The year of our Lord 2020 is underway, and it has already yielded fruit disproportionate to the days gone by at the Davenant House. On Friday, January 3rd and Saturday, January 4th, we hosted the annual Carolinas Regional Convivium. The topic was Literature in the Service of Christian Wisdom.

  • Retrieving a Sense of Belonging

    Retrieving a Sense of Belonging

    We live in an age when the most urgent question is the most fundamental question of all: “Who am I?” “Who are we?” The question of identity has been forced to the forefront, and our political and religious lives are reeling.

  • Davenant House Welcomes Michael Hughes as Director

    Davenant House Welcomes Michael Hughes as Director

    Three years ago, we at Davenant were blessed by the Lord with the opportunity to purchase a beautiful small retreat center property in the Blue Ridge Mountains of upstate SC, which we dubbed Davenant House. We enthusiastically sketched out a vision for a study center dedicated to the renewal of Protestant wisdom, offering residential courses, study retreats, and serving as a hub for building networks and ministry in the region. Unfortunately, the path forward for this work proved far rockier and more winding than we had anticipated, and we had all but abandoned this vision when the Lord brought Michael Hughes and his family across our path last summer. Over this winter, He opened many doors for bringing the Hugheses on, beginning in Summer 2019, as full-time directors of Davenant House, ready to realize the initial ambitious vision for the property, engage in active student ministry throughout the Western Carolinas, and raise funds for the further development of the property. It is with greatest excitement and joy that we introduce them to you today.

  • Carolinas Convivium Recap

    Carolinas Convivium Recap

    Brent King reflects on an engaging weekend of fellowship and learning at Davenant House.

  • “Plainly Diabolical”: Bishop Davenant Weighs in on Clerical Celibacy

    “Plainly Diabolical”: Bishop Davenant Weighs in on Clerical Celibacy

    John Davenant, as Lady Margaret Professor of Theology at Cambridge, gave a lecture in the 1610’s defending the thesis that: “Thus, marrying in the Sacerdotal Order is lawful, and the decree for its prohibition in the Church of Rome is unlawful, anti-Christian, and plainly diabolical.” In this post, I want to highlight some of the more pertinent parts of Davenant’s lecture as they relate to the present problems facing the Roman Catholic Church.

  • Do Something Hard This Summer

    Do Something Hard This Summer

    A few years Alan Jacobs posted an old syllabus for a class at the University of Michigan taught by the great English poet W. H. Auden. It required 6,000 pages of reading… in one semester. Titled “Fate and the Individual in European Literature,” Auden’s course required students to read the entire Divine Comedy, Horace’s Odes, Augustine’s Confessions, four Shakespeare plays, the Pensees, Blake’s Narrative of Heaven and Hell, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, Melville’s Moby Dick, and selections from Kierkegaard, Baudelaire, Ibsen, Rimbaud, Henry Adams, Rilke, and Kafka. At the time, many laughed at the list and ruefully shook their head at the crazy standards that once prevailed in American higher ed. But then this year three scholars at the University of Oklahoma decided to do something different: They essentially taught Auden’s course.